September 19, 2008

Deepak Chopra, in his blog, answered yesterday a question “I had in my heart and mind” after coming back from the Yoga Teacher Training:

Question: During several years my life has been deeply spiritual. Meditation, reading spiritual literature and a constant inner work and process of spiritual and personal development has radically changed both my inner and outer life. I really felt connected to God and my prayers were literally answered in many ways.

Of some reason which I don’t really understand, now I suddenly feel lost and disconnected. It’s as if a very critical and questioning part of me has entered the stage. For example, reading spiritual books was a thing that really engaged me before, now I’m only thinking “from where do they get this, how can they be so sure of what they are saying?” When I pray, I feel like “to what am I praying, what am I doing, why am I doing it?” I feel like I have swallowed a lot of concepts that others have made for me.

I want to discover my own truth, but I don’t even know where to start, and also the critical me says there is no truth. I don’t understand at all why I am here on this earth or how anything works, and the more I’m thinking of these things, the more uncertain I get of everything. Where to start and what to do when you feel totally spiritual lost? Since I’m writing this to you, there must be a part of me that believes there is a way back. Now I wonder if you have any advice on how to find that path again?

Answer: This is a most valuable stage of your spiritual journey — where you shift from an external orientation to authority to your own internal authority and truth. The easiest way to escape this feeling of being lost is to find yourself, and for that you need only be yourself. Before you begin your meditation, remind yourself that this is your opportunity to leave behind all your beliefs, conditionings, concepts and confusing thought processes.

Meditation is a time for you to be that authentic being that you are underneath all the changing roles that you play throughout the day. After meditation, instead of reengaging the mind with spiritual books and wondering why you’re here and who you’re praying to, put your attention on simply being awake and present in the moment without needing to have a definitive judgment on things one way or another. As you consolidate your sense of conscious selfhood, you will find that this quiet Self can be relied upon as an intelligent reference point in all that you do. If you read some book or listen to someone who is supposed to be an authority, you will find that if it has truth and value for you, it will resonate with your deepest Being. If it is not for you, you won’t feel that resonance inside. This is how your inner Self becomes your constant guide on the path.



Therefore let’s meditate, let’s not neglect it – it’s essential!

I guess a part of the reason I felt confused was the fact that I needed to ‘interpret’ many Vedic teachings through my knowledge of Jesus. I think that yoga definitely helps one to develop virtues and mastery over oneself in a way that has been largely neglected at least in the Lutheran Church, which forms my spiritual background.